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A RIGHT TO THE CITY

Learn more about DCPL branches and programs here.

Click here for a list of the satellite exhibits.

Film and Director Q&A with Dr. Sonya Grier: "DogParks and Coffee Shops: Diversity Seeking in Changing Neighborhoods"

Mt. Pleasant Neighborhood Library: Saturday, March 30 at 2-4pm

Part of the exhibition film series for A Right to the City, this 2014 short film by Sonya Grier examines gentrification, consumption and diversity among both old and new residents in Washington DC Neighborhoods including U Street and Shaw. Film was co-directed by VanessaPerry. A Q&A with Grier follows the screening. Image courtesy Sonya Grier. Click here to learn more and RSVP.


Author Talk with Peter Moskowitz: "How to Kill a City: Gentrification, Inequality, and the Fight for the Neighborhood"

Shaw (Watha T.) Library: Sunday, April 7 from 2-3:30pm

In his book, How to Kill a City: Gentrification, Inequality, and the Fight for the Neighborhood, Moskowitz adds to the growing canon aimed at understanding and explaining the process of gentrification, and how local governments cede their power over residents’ lives to private interests. Image courtesy of the author. Click here to learn more and RSVP.


Family Mural Art Workshop with Luis Peralta del Valle

Anacostia Neighborhood Library: Saturday, May 4 from 11:30am-1:30pm

Join celebrated Washington, DC artist Luis Peralta del Valle as he guides workshop participants in creating a communal mural that honors the rich tapestry of DC history and culture. The workshop is being offered in conjunction with the exhibition, A Right to the City and uses the themes of communal engagement and cultural activism as foundations in creating a group inspired artwork. All workshop materials will be provided. This workshop is suitable for ages 6 and above, and adults. Click here to learn more and RSVP.


Author Talk with Dr. Ashante Reese: Black Food Geographies:Race, Self-Reliance, and Food Access in Washington, D.C.

Deanwood Library: Saturday, July 6 from 2-3:30pm

In her book, Black Food Geographies, Reese examines the structural forces that determine food access in urban areas, highlighting Black residents' navigation of and resistance to unequal food distribution systems. Linking these local food issues to the national problem of systemic racism, the author examines the history of the majority-Black Deanwood neighborhood of Washington, D.C. Limited copies of the book will be available for purchase. Image courtesy of the author. Click here to learn more and RSVP.