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Frederick Douglass Home

Object Details

Creator
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum
Scope and Contents
Narrator provides an overview of abolitionist Frederick Douglass' life, work, and spirit from his birth as a slave in Talbot County, Maryland to his death in Washington, D.C. Douglass' experiences with racial prejudice and segregation as well as his involvement in the Underground Railroad and civil rights movements, including women's rights, are explored. Douglass lived in New Bedford (Mass.), Rochester (N.Y.), the neighborhood of Anacostia in Washington, D.C., and England, where he fled for two years after writing "The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass" in 1845. Douglass and his son Frederick Jr. recruited black men for the Civil War while his sons Lewis and Charles joined the 54th Massachusetts Regiment. While championing many reform causes, Douglass worked alongside William Lloyd Garrison, John Brown, Blanche Kelso Bruce, John Mercer Langston, Francis Cardozo, and May Wright Sewall.
Narration. Part of ACM Museum Events, PR, and Ceremonies Recordings. AV002692-1 and AV002692-2: same content. AV002692-1: sound beeps throughout recording. Dated 19731201.
Date
1973
Extent
1 Sound recording (cartridge, 1/4 inch)
Type
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Narration
Topic
African Americans
African American abolitionists
Abolitionists
Civil rights
Civil rights leaders
Antislavery movements
Civil rights movements
Slavery
Underground Railroad
Racism
Race discrimination
Segregation
Slaves -- Emancipation
Women's rights
Historic sites
Place
United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865
Talbot County (Md.)
New Bedford (Mass.)
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
Rochester (N.Y.)
United States
England
Culture
African American
Collection Citation
Anacostia Community Museum Programs and Projects, 1967-1989, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier
ACMA.09-023, Item ACMA AV002692-1
Local Numbers
ACMA AV002692-2
General
Title transcribed from physical asset.
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